Our Presidents

Apr 16

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

President Nixon and Bob Hope playing golf in the Oval Office.  4/20/73.

(Source: facebook.com)

Apr 15

Helen Thomas - First Female Member of the White House Press Corps 
Veteran journalist Helen Thomas served in the White House press corps under ten presidents, and became the first female member of the group during President Kennedy’s administration. An advocate for women’s rights, Thomas convinced President Kennedy not to attend annual dinners for White House correspondents and photographers if women were not invited.
Pictured: President Kennedy speaks with Thomas in the Rose Garden, April 1963. 
-from the JFK Library 

Helen Thomas - First Female Member of the White House Press Corps

Veteran journalist Helen Thomas served in the White House press corps under ten presidents, and became the first female member of the group during President Kennedy’s administration. An advocate for women’s rights, Thomas convinced President Kennedy not to attend annual dinners for White House correspondents and photographers if women were not invited.

Pictured: President Kennedy speaks with Thomas in the Rose Garden, April 1963. 

-from the JFK Library 

Apr 14

Portrait of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., circa 1913. Bernard T. Welky, a Valentine Seaver Originals Company sales representative, sent the photograph to President John F. Kennedy with a letter dated April 14, 1962.
-from the JFK Library

Portrait of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., circa 1913. Bernard T. Welky, a Valentine Seaver Originals Company sales representative, sent the photograph to President John F. Kennedy with a letter dated April 14, 1962.

-from the JFK Library

Country roads take John Denver to the White House 
Denver, then considered to be the most popular singer in the world, was in the area as part of a nationwide tour. He played four concerts at the Capital Center, one of which Susan Ford attended.The signer met with President Ford in the Oval Office on April 14, 1975.  During the meeting President Ford and Denver discussed the upcoming American Bicentennial, as Denver had been appointed as a youth advisor to the Colorado Bicentennial Commission. They also had another connection through Colorado as both enjoyed skiing there. Denver lived in Aspen, and President Ford often hit the slopes while vacationing in Vail.
-from the Ford Library 

Country roads take John Denver to the White House

Denver, then considered to be the most popular singer in the world, was in the area as part of a nationwide tour. He played four concerts at the Capital Center, one of which Susan Ford attended.

The signer met with President Ford in the Oval Office on April 14, 1975.  During the meeting President Ford and Denver discussed the upcoming American Bicentennial, as Denver had been appointed as a youth advisor to the Colorado Bicentennial Commission. They also had another connection through Colorado as both enjoyed skiing there. Denver lived in Aspen, and President Ford often hit the slopes while vacationing in Vail.

-from the Ford Library 

[video]

Apr 09

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.
When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  
This week, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.
Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.
Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.
Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.

LBJ Signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Fifty years ago, the work of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Passage was not easy and depended on the painstaking efforts of civil rights leaders, cooperation in a resistant Senate, and growth in public support.

When the bill was finally signed on July 2, 1964, it was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction.  

This week, The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas honors this historic legislation.  Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, and Carter are part of the Summit, joining a full schedule of programs that address the civil rights issues we face today.

Watch the live stream of the Civil Rights Summit here.

Follow the journey of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on Google Cultural Institute.

Explore Civil Rights Presidential History here.

Apr 08

[video]

fordlibrarymuseum:

Happy Birthday, Betty Ford!
First Lady Betty Ford cuts her birthday cake prior to a performance of Hello, Dolly! at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on April 8, 1975.

fordlibrarymuseum:

Happy Birthday, Betty Ford!

First Lady Betty Ford cuts her birthday cake prior to a performance of Hello, Dolly! at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on April 8, 1975.

(Source: research.archives.gov)

Apr 07

[video]

Apr 06

lbjlibrary:


April 6, 1965. Lady Bird plants a cherry tree at the Cherry Blossom festival in the Washington D.C. Tidal Basin. 
The First Lady’s Committee for a More Beautiful Capital has been meeting for several months now, and their efforts have included plantings along the Mall, cleaning old statues, and improving the Watts Branch section of northeastern D.C. The people of Japan donated 3,800 cherry trees to the effort.  

lbjlibrary:

April 6, 1965. Lady Bird plants a cherry tree at the Cherry Blossom festival in the Washington D.C. Tidal Basin. 

The First Lady’s Committee for a More Beautiful Capital has been meeting for several months now, and their efforts have included plantings along the Mall, cleaning old statues, and improving the Watts Branch section of northeastern D.C. The people of Japan donated 3,800 cherry trees to the effort.